The Ayn Rand Institute (ARI), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization headquartered in Irvine, California, works to introduce young people to Ayn Rand’s novels, to support scholarship and research based on her ideas, and to promote the principles of reason, rational self-interest, individual rights and laissez-faire capitalism to the widest possible audience. The Institute is named for novelist-philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982), who is best known for her novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.

Current Opportunities for Ayn Rand Institute

Anthem Essay Contest

Opportunity Type: Scholarship
Application Deadline: March 20, 2018
Description: Essays will be judged on both style and content. Judges will look for writing that is clear, articulate and logically organized. Winning essays must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of Anthem.

Atlas Shrugged Essay Contest

Opportunity Type: Scholarship
Application Deadline: October 23, 2018
Description: The winning applicant will be judged on both style and content. Judges will look for writing that is clear, articulate and logically organized. Winning essays must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of Atlas Shrugged.

The Fountainhead Essay Contest

Opportunity Type: Scholarship
Application Deadline: April 26, 2018
Description: Essays will be judged on both style and content. Judges will look for writing that is clear, articulate and logically organized. Winning essays must demonstrate an outstanding grasp of the philosophic meaning of The Fountainhead.

Fountainhead Essay Contest

Opportunity Type: Scholarship
Application Deadline: April 26, 2018
Description: You must write an essay of no fewer than 800 and no more than 1,600 words on a topic relating to Ayn Rand's novel, "The Fountainhead." 

Select one of the following topics:

  1. At the end of Part II, Ellsworth Toohey confronts Howard Roark and says, "Mr. Roark, we're alone here. Why don't you tell me what you think of me?" To which Roark replies, "But I don’t think of you." Explain how this brief exchange relates to the novel's theme.

  2. Gail Wynand is a brilliant individual who rose out of the slums by means of his own talent and effort. But despite his reverence for man's noblest achievements, his newspaper, The Banner, presents the most lurid and loathsome values. Why does Wynand pander in this manner?

  3. In dynamiting Cortlandt Homes, Howard Roark breaks the law. What is his moral and philosophical argument for the rectitude of his action?

Contact Information

Ayn Rand Institute
2121 Alton Parkway, Suite 250
Irvine, CA 92606-4926
www.aynrand.org